ABF

Hornets fall in OT

By Bob Evans FPS Correspondent   CANTON – Momentum is a funny thing. A team has it and then all of a sudden it switches to the other side. That is how More »

Farm Bureau presidents talk ‘ag’ on Capitol Hill

By Leigh Ann Rutledge Accent Editor   WASHINGTON, D.C. – Ohio Farm Bureau Federation (OFBF) county presidents and/or vice presidents, members of local media and other guests visited Washington D.C. for the More »

By Nancy Schaar FPS Correspondent   DELLROY – The former Atwood Lake Lodge and Resort has a new owner, a new name and a new life. The facility, now known as The More »

Carrollton school board approves armed staff in safety zone

By Nancy Schaar FPS Correspondent   CARROLLTON – With three board members present, the Carrollton Exempted Village School District board of education approved a one-sentence agenda item that allows armed staff in More »

CHS students to stage ‘Catch Me If You Can’ this weekend

The true story of a real fake “Catch Me If You Can”, the Carrollton High School spring musical, will be held March 23-25 at 7 p.m. in Bell-Herron Middle School. Tickets are More »

 

NBC, IVC announce all-stars

FPS Staff Report

Post-season awards have been announced by officials from the Northeastern Buckeye Conference (NBC) and Inter Valley Conference.

 

NBC All-League selections

Wrestling

Carrollton wrestling coach Ken Pasiuk was named coach of the year and his son, senior Aidan Pasiuk, a state champion, was named player of the year.

Carrollton dominated the list of first team wrestling selections, placing six on the list of 16 names.

Joining Aidan Pasiuk on the list are: junior Justin Shaw, senior Adam Shaw, sophomore Brandon Daniels, senior Brenton Miller and sophomore Ben Pasiuk.

Freshman Robbie Daniels was a second team selection along with Minerva junior Travis Kuttler, senior Alex Lucas and freshman Luke Chaddock.

Carrollton freshman Nathan Blake and junior Noah Carrothers were honorable mention selections along with Minerva juniors Jay Chaddock and Connor Fritz.

 

Hornets fall in OT

By Bob Evans

Malvern forward Mark Mayle lifts a shot over the outstretched arms of Luthern East center Justin Motley during the regional game.

Malvern forward Mark Mayle lifts a shot over the outstretched arms of Luthern East center Justin Motley during the regional game.

FPS Correspondent

 

CANTON – Momentum is a funny thing. A team has it and then all of a sudden it switches to the other side.

That is how it worked for the Malvern boys basketball team Tuesday night in the Division IV regional semifinal against Cleveland Heights Lutheran East at the Canton Memorial Field House.

The Hornets built a sizeable lead midway through the second quarter. But the Falcons grabbed the momentum and came back to defeat the Hornets 69-64 in overtime.

In the final four minutes of the second period Malvern built a 14-point lead. Using their fast-paced full court press, the Falcons forced six straight Hornet turnovers and turned them into baskets and cut the Malvern lead to 30-27 at halftime.

“All in all I thought we played pretty good except for the end of the second quarter,” said Malvern head coach Dennis Tucci. “That was not D4 (Division 4) pressure we were facing. It was D1 or D2 pressure. We handled it good in the second half.”

Tickets available for local Wild Turkey Federation banquet

The Carroll County Doublebeards, part of the National Wild Turkey Federation (NWTF), is hosting their 18th annual banquet March 25 at FFA Camp Muskingum.

Doors open at 5:30 p.m. Dinner, catered by Jimmy’s BBQ, will be served at 7 p.m. The meal includes pulled pork, marinated chicken breast, garlic parmesan potatoes, California spring vegetables, rolls, salad and dessert. Adult beverages will also be available.

Tickets are $60 single, $80 couple, $275 sponsor or $300 for sponsor couples ticket. Jakes ticket (youth) is $30. Meal is included with ticket purchase.

“Last year from our banquet we raised $22,000 for habitat and wildlife conservation/preservation,” Brad Luckey, Doublebeards treasurer said. “As the local NWTF chapter, we continue to be able to provide funds for the NWTF and we can apply those funds to be used in habitat projects in the local area.”

Luckey encourages anyone wanting to help with their mission, to attend the banquet to learn more.

“I encourage people to join our flock’,” Luckey continued. “You can’t make things happen without getting involved.”

For tickets, call Luckey at 760-791-2175.

 

Farm Bureau presidents talk ‘ag’ on Capitol Hill

By Leigh Ann Rutledge

The trip began with a tour of the American Farm Bureau Federation building and a trip to the roof to “check out the view”. Shown above are country presidents with the Capital Building in the background. They are (from left): John Seleski, Harrison County; Jim Rowe, Tuscarawas County; Duayne Wetherell, Jefferson County; and Bernie Heffelbower, Carroll County.

The trip began with a tour of the American Farm Bureau Federation building and a trip to the roof to “check out the view”. Shown above are country presidents with the Capital Building in the background. They are (from left): John Seleski, Harrison County; Jim Rowe, Tuscarawas County; Duayne Wetherell, Jefferson County; and Bernie Heffelbower, Carroll County.

Accent Editor

 

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Ohio Farm Bureau Federation (OFBF) county presidents and/or vice presidents, members of local media and other guests visited Washington D.C. for the OFBF County President’s Trip March 13-15.

The tour is held in March each year and gives county presidents the opportunity to talk with their congressmen and various representatives from agencies related to the agriculture industry.

The whirlwind trip includes brainstorming, presentations and, of course, good food. A total of 73 presidents and/or vice-presidents, including Carroll County Farm Bureau President Bernie Heffelbower, attended the 71st annual trip. Flying in from all over Ohio to five different airports, early arrivals had an opportunity to learn tips for advocacy on “The Hill” and how to be a successful Farm Bureau advocate. Groups met at the American Farm Bureau Federation (AFBF) Office, located at 600 Maryland Ave. SW.

Participants had the option to tour the facility and check out the view from the roof. Though windy, the roof gave a fabulous view of the Capitol Building and the National Archives, among other sites. Following a box lunch, participants were briefed on the following American Farm Bureau issues: Regulatory reform, tax reform and trade.

By Nancy Schaar

FPS Correspondent

Poster boards on display during a public meeting last week at The Bluffs (formerly Atwood Lodge) outlined the timeline for the opening of the facility.

Poster boards on display during a public meeting last week at The Bluffs (formerly Atwood Lodge) outlined the timeline for the opening of the facility.

 

DELLROY – The former Atwood Lake Lodge and Resort has a new owner, a new name and a new life.

The facility, now known as The Bluffs, is schedule to open July 1.  It will offer 150 beds for clients who need alcohol or drug addiction rehabilitation treatment.  Construction and remodeling is expected to begin April 1 and be completed by June 1 of this year.

The property was purchased by Bill Burns at a public auction from county commissioners  last August. It has been leased to Addiction Campuses. Brent Clements is the chief executive officer of Addiction Campuses and Eric Mitchell serves as chief marketing officer for the company.

Clements announced during a community meeting held at The Bluffs last week that Addiction Campuses has a lease for the property, but is in partnership with Burns at this time. He said investment partners will purchase the real estate in the coming months and Addiction Campuses will own the 75-acre property.

Monroe Township trustees previously hosted two meetings with local residents to address safety and other issues regarding the business.

The Thursday meeting, held in the dining room of the former lodge, had more than 100 people in attendance. Many questions were asked and answered.  Only a few residents were still concerned about their safety from the clients who will be staying at The Bluffs.

Clements patiently explained again the clients sign in for a 30-day treatment plan and continue with a one-year long follow-up program.

“These aren’t criminals.  These aren’t people who are sent here by a court order. These are people who have decided they need to make a big change in their life and they are committed to doing that,” said Clements.

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